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Farmette 1769

by Monica Melograna-Ward

Tag Archives: canine

We recently started a VERY small canine rescue. The idea is to adopt one black dog out of Gaston County Animal Shelter and re-home. They charge $90.00 which includes vetting and spay/neuter. Our adoption fee of $95.00 will fund the pull for the next dog and so on.

The Gaston Shelter has a Facebook group (run by a very dedicated volunteer). I browse and re-post/share dogs sometimes to help spread the word for possible adopters. There was a very pregnant dog at the shelter.

We already have one black dog available for adoption. But, I could not stand the idea of putting down a dog that was so full of pups that far along.

That dog is here now. And here is a good story from May 20, 2012.

After checking in on Penelope, I worked outside for an hour. I headed straight in to get a freelance client pitch finished. I had switched the video camera back from the mudroom to the driveway for the day. That was a mistake. Our son Dorian heard pups squeaking. I am so grateful that he did. One half hour more of me being focused on something else would have guaranteed failure in Pup #1’s outcome.

In the mudroom was Penelope and 3 puppies. One was cold, not breathing and not moving. I don’t want to get graphic about what this looked like, but she was dead.

Don’t stop reading yet!

I had just been talking to one of my chick buyers (we hatch and sell chicks for $ to buy food for our livestock) about waking up a dead, cold chick. I have done it once and her mother had done it when she was a kid. Coldness preserves the brain.

Our son grabbed the hand towel I had left on the piano for when the pups arrived. Glad that was handy! I started rubbing her to get her warmed up. This resulted in a few movements. They seemed to be electrical responses only. Again, I won’t get too graphic since it was not a pretty sight.

The project that I had been working on outside was a chick hatcher. I wanted something where the chicks could hatch and not get the incubator dirty. It was now in the living room for testing and adjustments – being homemade. I grabbed the fan and thermostat out and turned the heat lamp on. The top went on with Pup #1 in it. Our son watched through the viewing window while I went to check on the other two pups.

This is where we start to see light.

After they were cleared of goo, I went back to evaluate the situation. She was making some gasping movements like someone just pulled up from near drowning.

Gasping was still her main movement, but the rib cage had a very subtle rising and falling. She was starting to breath. After a while, she started to move. And then to squeak.

What a strong puppy!

She was brought back in to her mom. I kept an eye on her while helpig momma dog get pup sacs open and clear noses/mouths. I slept like a rock last night.

Pup #1 is FAT and full term. She also has her mother’s life saving colostrum to boost up her immune system. This pup is acting no differently than the other pups.

Here she is one day later: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3AANlSR_nA0

I grabbed the first safe thing I saw to tag her with. It is a pink silly band – shaped like a dinosaur. We’ll check her a bit more often than the other pups, but she is eating and squirming like champ!

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In the Charlotte Region of North Carolina, we have had the first White Christmas in 63 years. The moon on the breast of the new-fallen snow, did not give the luster of mid-day to the open country at that time. Even if the snow had stopped and the clouds cleared, at most, there was merely a sliver of the moon visible on December 25, 1947.

The snow started here in the evening on December 25, 2010. We were full from a lovely holiday meal, as we gazed out at the gently falling flakes. It was peaceful and beautiful. Since it started at the end of the day, we had little left to do but enjoy the calm that belongs to natural winter blankets. The livestock were nestled all snug in their straw, while visions of sweet feed danced in their heads – and their jaws.

Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse;*

Our pack of canines had not dared venture out the dog door into the cold, wet world of wintry splendor. They truly enjoy easy access to the warmth of the mud/laundry room. Luckily, the weather keeps any mischievous souls away from the country roads, and so, no need for the watch dogs outside.

When I had gone out to check on our flock for the night, our homing pigeon was out collecting snow on her wings. I had put up a shelter for her the day before, after the coops had been re-arranged. Apparently, she did not approve. I grabbed, luckily caught her and placed her in the main coop for the night. We’ll have to keep putting her food at the door of her new house to help entice her in.

Our small goat herd came out briefly to wolf down their grain. Then they scurried back into the well shed. They like to be out in the freezing weather, but do not normally stay out in precipitation.

We lost a nanny to the cold/wet about this time last year. She and her billy had access to two small shelters on pallets (the male goat had just broken the third; the one on stilts). The pen had gotten too muddy.  The day had started out wet and warm. It had ended icy and cold.

The high strung billy that had a knack for breaking everything, was replaced with a tiny, mild-mannered billy. Ever since then, our goats have stayed in the fenced area with the shed where we can keep a close eye on them, instead of in the small pen on the far side of the house.

I find it amazing how the equine will stand out in the cold and rain to munch on a round bale of hay or just stand in the field. “Rocky”, the Shetland pony, presently looks like a woolly mammoth, so I do not worry about him. The “Big Man” Dakota has a good winter coat for a small cob size horse, but not the stout body. He has a water-proof blanket on the way from ChickSaddlery.com.

In the dark, they were lured into the run-in using a grain incentive. Grain is like a drug to them. If you ever have trouble catching a horse, just shake a bucket full of pelleted feed and they will come.

View from the road*

We enjoy the changes of the seasons here on the Farmette and the snowy wonderland. The New Year is nearly here, but winter is just getting going. The temperature will remain low for the next few months.

The magic of the winter holiday season bestows upon us many gifts. It also a reminds us to contribute to peace on earth and goodwill to men (and beast). Our life here would not be whole without having both storms and clear skies. But, Spring will be very welcome when it arrives.

* Pics were taken the next evening, December 26, 2010.

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Dogs

Let’s have another introduction from the pack. Grace is dog #1. She is the oldest at six years and affectionately described as “Dumb as a box of rocks”. She is all about goofing around with toys, playing fetch and reaching a goal.

If the goal is on the other side of a fence, she will chew, dig, scrape, ram or anything that it takes to get to the other side. She could set her sites on a soda can and there would be no stopping her once it was the target of her fancy. So, unluckily, unless supervised, she has to be tied even though her area is fenced.

Grace - Golden Retriever

If you need a kid friendly dog, a Golden Retriever is a great breed. Pure breeding is focused on certain traits and can be used as a guide for temperament. Hybrids and mutts can be good choices too.

A calm puppy is the best choice any way you go as they will be the easiest to train. Training Tip: All dogs need meal time to be quiet and non-competitive. Making sure that your dog is used to hands touching them, while they are eating, is crucial for safety.

Supervised Meal Time

If you plan to bring an adult dog into the family, have it tested for aggression. Although fixable, it is not advisable to start with this type of problem if you have little humans in the house. People without vulnerable family members (having faces level with sharp teeth) are better suited to attempt repair on aggressive behavior.

When you get the right match and care for them properly, a dog will be your loyal companion, protector of your flock and source of unconditional love.

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