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Farmette1769's Blog

by Monica Melograna-Ward

Category Archives: Recipes

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The Main Ingredient in this Weekend’s Farmette 1769 Recipe is
Farmer’s Market Humanely Raised Rabbit Meat.

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This is not where meat comes from. It has been neatly packaged for your consumption. I was raised with this. At some point I was a vegetarian and I still eat many vegetarian meals right now. But, humans existence today happened because we are omnivores, giving us a major advantage over other mammals. When meat is scarce, we can switch to plant-based food and vice versa. Our two-legged, tall, mostly hairless, sweat gland filled bodies, give us the ability to follow prey until they are more worn down than us. So, having said all that about my omnivorous diet…

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Would you rather your meat come from here?

CHICKEN-PROCESSING-PLANT

Or here?

The meat used for today’s recipe blog post was procured from the Charlotte Regional Farmer’s Market. The man that I purchased one rabbit’s worth of meat from, raises, butchers, and sells this there on the weekends.

Albeit with protest from a dear friend of mine, that now thinks I am a #savage pet #rabbit eater, here is this weekend’s farmette recipe:

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Marinate Rabbit Meat in a bowl with the following flavorful ingredients using whatever amount strikes your fancy.

Salt
Pepper
Rosemary
Thyme
Lemon Juice
Olive Oil
Fresh Chopped Garlic

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Then, just put it on the grill or roast it in you oven.

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It not only looks, but tastes a lot like chicken. Rabbit meat has a gamey flare. It is a bit more difficult to get off the bone than poultry, due to muscle tone. The first time that I ate rabbit meat, was breaded and deep fried. It was great! I would have eaten it more often over the years if it was more readily available. But, now, I have not only found a source for rabbit meat, but one that does not factory raise or slaughter the animal.

Happy Weekend Cooking! :)MMW

 

 

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It’s Strawberry Season! Yeah!!!

Get some from the grocery store, farmer’s market or pick your own fields. Then…

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1. Fresh Strawberries

Wash the strawberries.
Then pull the stems out and chop the opposite tip off.
Slice them up and then cut those slices in half.

2. Organic Cane Juice Sugar. White Refined Sugar is fine also (It’s desert, and not supposed to be good for you).

Add a teaspoon or two to your bowl of lovely strawberry slices.

3. Honey (Local if at all possible)

Use a heaping tablespoon full.

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4. Angel Food Cake – Buy One

I bake things like Banana Bread and Oatmeal Cookies. They do not take a lot of skill. That is where my cooking abilities end and my baking attempts begin. I LOVE to COOK. I LIKE to BAKE. If you LOVE to BAKE, have at it ANGEL FOOD CAKE.

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5. Powdered Sugar

MAKE YOUR OWN POWDERED SUGAR
If I was feeling industrious, which I was not, I would have used the organic sugar and run it through the blender. You can do this with any type of sugar to turn it into powder. I keep some refined, prepared, store-bought, powdered sugar in a kitchen cabinet that is dedicated to baking and salads (nuts, raisins, baking powder, etc.). It is handy in a pinch.

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6. Ready Whipped Cream – Buy this too

or

How to Make Perfect Whipped Cream Every Time

What better way is there to celebrate Strawberry Season than with Strawberries & Cake?

It is early on Sunday morning. You still have time to go out and get your supplies for a simple after dinner treat.

Tune in next Weekend for Monica’s BBQ Grilled Rabbit

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Easy Farmette Dinner:

Boneless, Skinless Chicken Breasts coated with One Whisked Egg, White Wheat Flour and then fried in Vegetable Oil.

Steamed Bok Choy

Baked Sweet Potatoes (with Butter!)


 


And for the farmette’s chickens (and duck):

Kitchen scraps of salad greens, kidney beans, corn, broccoli and breaded fish nuggets. The chickens, and the duck, loved the fish! They came back for the greens later.

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:)MMW

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With a busy weekend happening, Monica’s Weekend Recipe will be short. This article is focused on just one cooking ingredient – eggs. Not only is this about eggs, but, specifically, Duck Eggs.

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What are the Benefits to Eating Duck Eggs?
by Countryside Daily Magazine
  • Duck eggs stay fresher longer, due to their thicker shell.
  • Duck eggs are richer, with more albumen, which makes cakes and other pastries fluffier.
  • Duck eggs have more Omega-3 fatty acids.
  • People who cannot eat chicken eggs, due to allergies, can often eat duck eggs.

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Ducks make much more mess than chickens, so we opted to keep just one duck. Since the coop is predator proof, and we opted for standard sized birds this time (instead of bantam/mini), we feel more comfortable naming them – since they won’t end up being meals for foxes, weasels, raccoons, snakes, hawks, falcons, feral cats, stray dogs or coyotes. Our egg laying duck is named Macy.

Info
via Wikipedia
A duckling is a young duck in downy plumage or baby duck. A male duck is called a drake and the female is called a duck, or in ornithology a hen.

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I usually take my coffee with me while tending to the poultry in the morning.

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One last pic of Macy and her buddies, happily eating kitchen scraps.

Have fun cooking with eggs, and if you have the option, try duck eggs. They are delicious!

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Chop up 1 Large Napa/Chinese Cabbage and 3 or 4 Green Onions.

Kimchi_2Rinse the Cabbage with Water in a Strainer.

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Cover with a bunch of Salt (1 measuring cup full maybe).

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Use your clean hands or a big spoon to toss. Your Cabbage pieces should now be wet and thoroughly salted.

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Let the Cabbage sit for 20-30 Minutes.

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You will see that the Cabbage shrinks down as moisture is drawn out by the Salt.

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Then rinse and strain your Cabbage.

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Add spices. I use Cayenne pepper, Green Onions, freshly chopped Garlic…

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For this batch I included some whole Thai Peppers. Mix all of your flavorings in with the cabbage.

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Put everything in a large glass or plastic Jar with a firmly fitting lid. Let it sit out at room temperature for 3-7 days, depending on how rich you like your Kimchi.

I was taught this recipe while living in Germany 30 years ago by a Korean neighbor friend. So, this is an authentic Korean Kimchi recipe from an indirect source.

Notes: There are many variations on this recipe including your main vegetable.
Also, you can add ingredients like ginger or preserved fish.

Happy Weekend Warrior Cooking!

 

 

 

 

 

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WYSIWYG, but here is the list of ingredients:

One Cast Iron Pan saturated with Vegetable Oil
Broccoli
Onions
Tomatoes
Salmon
Lemon Juice
Dijon Mustard
Fresh Dill
Sweet Potatoes wrapped in foil

Put the sweet potatoes in the oven at 400 degrees for 1/2 hour.
Add the Cast Iron Pan full of everything else and continue to cook for 1/2 more hour.

Easy, Peasy, Lemon Squeezy!

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Guest Blog Post

Tested and Written by Jamie Andrew Ward
Edited by Monica Melograna-Ward

Jamie’s Kombucha – 101

K1

Before you begin, you must get a SCOBY. This is the engine that drives the whole kombucha car. You can get one online or ask a friend for one. A “baby” scoby (which can be easily peeled off and removed) grows with each batch, so people can share them easily.

You’ve gotten your scoby. Now what do you do?

K2

Step A1: Boil water.
I always use a little extra water, in addition to what would fill my container – due to evaporation. Boil it for 15 minutes to ensure that any impurities are gone.

K3

Step A2: Make a big batch of black tea.
Black tea works best and helps keep the scoby healthy. You can use herbal, but only after a few batches with black tea. Then you need to go back to black. I use 18 tea bags per 1.5 gallons.

K4

Step A3: Add sugar.
I use 2 cups per 1.5 gallons of water. The scoby ferments on the sugar and thus eats most of it. The longer you ferment, the less sugar you have in your kombucha. GTS has 2g per serving. I aim for about that level.

Step A4: Make sure that the sugar has dissolved into the water, then cool.
Let your mixture return to room temperature. This is crucial, because hot water will kill a scoby.

Step A5: Place in large GLASS container. Cover with cheesecloth and a rubber band to seal the top.
This lets the air in, and thus fermentation to occur. It also keeps the bugs out. Gnats love kombucha. I like jars with a spout, but the spout must not be metal!

K5

Fermentation

Step A6: Place in cool, dry location for about 2 weeks.
You can taste along the way to check on how your production is going. You can use a straw and extract a sample. Insert the straw into the liquid, then cover one end of the straw with a finger to pull some drops out.

2 weeks later…

K6

Secondary Fermentation (Bubbles and Flavor)

Step B1: Remove scoby, and some of the tea, into a separate container.
Store this until your next batch. You can look up how to keep a scoby and feed it between batches. I tend to do one batch after another, so I have not had need to learn how to do this.

K7

Step B2: Add a tablespoon or two of sugar to the tea.
You will see it foam up.

K8

Step B3: Set out your sterilized jars.
I run then through the dishwasher, twice. Recycled GT containers work the best. I was using ball jars also, but was not getting the fizz that I get from the GTs. I completely stopped using the mason jars. In a pinch, they work OK.

Step B4: Add juice, if desired, to the bottom of your jars, for flavor.
I use ½ cup of juice per 16 oz container. Add juice. Then add the tea.

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Step B5: Close containers tightly. Let sit (counter or table) for about 3-7 days.
I have found SEVEN to be the magic number of days – so, exactly one week.

Step B6: On the 8th day, refrigerate all bottles.
This slows down the fermentation process and allows your mixture to mellow, or, at the least, take its time developing. Experiment, have fun, and feel free to choose your own chill date.

Note:
If you get something slimy in your bottles, this is a baby scoby. You can remove or swallow this. It won’t harm you to ingest (GROSS! – comment by MMW).

Handy Tip:
When I clean the big containers, I use hot water, and a very versatile product, VINEGAR. I get a large bottle of white vinegar at Costco for about $3.00. It helps keep the PH okie dokie. I use vinegar to clean my coffee pot too. So, if you not only love kombucha, but also coffee, this is a great (and natural) cleaning product to keep stocked in your kitchen.

Conclusion

In the intervening weeks, I assess what I did and didn’t like about the latest, completed batch. Then, adjustments can be decided upon for the next time I begin production. Trial and error is where you will live for a while: More or less sugar, more or less juice, more or fewer tea bags, more or less sugar before the secondary fermentation, etc….

You’ll find your rhythm, enjoy special recipe homemade kombucha and save a lot of $$$. That’s it!

Happy Saturday and Enjoy Your Weekend Projects!

Please join us here on the Farmette!

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