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Farmette1769's Blog

by Monica Melograna-Ward

LittleSketchCoop

Despite being a generally patient person, there are a few things that test this quality for me. One of them is in building things. Creating a functional item is my focus when I am doing this type of task. I have the tendency to work quickly and get a bit sloppy. As long as the item is sturdy in the beginning, I am satisfied. I just want to get it done and move on to another project.

But, rushed structures have a tendency to come apart and don’t hold up in the long run. And they are also not visually pleasing. Since I want the new, super predator proof chicken coop to work as intended, last a long time and look great, I am taking my time. Meanwhile, my chickens are busy growing larger in their temporary housing in the garage. I need to get this done, but it is 11 degrees outside here in NC. I do not work well with frozen hands.

Note: This blog will post on Monday, but I am writing it on Saturday, January 6, 2018 and it is COLD.

I slowed this project down even more since working on a table top project with my brother over his Thanksgiving and New Years visits. He is a good influence on me in reference to project patience. I also learned that you have to be willing to take things apart and make adjustments if you want things to turn out really well. The photo below shows the result of about $100.00 total of materials, supplies and small, specialty tools for a nice farm-friendly table top.

Note: The metal table frame with legs came from Freecycle for $0.00.

TableProject

The following pics are of the general coop plan that I sketched out. In addition to being a safe and healthy environment, I also want it to be easy to maintain and move. The plan is modular. The floor, walls and top will be separate pieces that fit together. The roof and ventilation will keep it dry – that is a big requirement for chickens. Cold it OK, but wet/moist is not. The food, water and egg nesting box will be accessible from outside the coop. Water will be rainwater driven from the roof gutter. The wood floor provides safety from diggers (fox, raccoon and weasels). The skids make it moveable. And you will also be able to remove the roof, keep the walls together and remove them from the floor for a thorough, periodic cleaning.

CoopSketch1

CoopSketch2

Happy Building!

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