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Farmette1769's Blog

by Monica Melograna-Ward

FourThirtyAM

For a variety of reasons, which I have decided to keep private, our little Farmette was dismantled. We re-homed the two ponies – to great homes and caregivers. The last bantam chicken, a hermit crab and a parakeet, that were lingering here, also got new digs. Our two, now senior, but surprisingly energetic canines, were all that remained.

So, it has been three+ years and it is 4:30 in the morning. In this article’s featured image, you can see the yellow-tinged light coming from my office. It shines in the darkness of the cold night that permeates my pajamas, as I stand outside to take the picture (photo: Canon PowerShot A1300). I have gotten to the age where insomnia comes often and I now choose to take advantage of it. I get the quiet work done. The type that won’t wake up the whole household. This morning that work is writing, which I just adore.

The experience with farm animals; from horses to goats to pigs to sheep to chickens to guinea fowl to ducks to turkeys to quail to geese to bees, has been so enriching. We learned so much! And with all of that behind us, and a wealth of knowledge, we have decided to remake our mini farm, on a small and easily manageable scale.

We now have our two existing dogs, two new young cats and four Swedish Flower chickens. These are our two pairs of new chickens:

SwedishFlowers_1

Swedish Flower Chickens – 16 Weeks Old (photo: iPhone SE)

Swedish Flowers are a rare breed that has only been in the United States since 2010. I was browsing craigslist in the farm sales section and happened upon them. After looking them up online: https://www.backyardchickens.com/reviews/swedish-flower-chicken.11461/, I decided to go ahead and get them while they were still available. That means that they are currently residing in a four chamber travel cage while I construct the ultimate predator proof coop and run. Whenever I am outside working on the new coop, they get to hang out in the temporary outdoor pen.

The following is a photo (also taken with an iPhone SE) of the base of the coop in progress. There are nine old boards screwed into three old 4x4s that will be drilled with holes for pulling/moving the cage. Since taking the photo, I have removed the corner braces from the frame (This suggestion came from my brother J. He is helping me via pics, text and talk from Baltimore, MD). Most of the materials are being cannibalized from other cages and shelters on our property. So far, the only new materials I plan to purchase are metal braces, paint and some sort of repair material(s) for the aluminum roofing.

PPcoop_base

As you can see, the base is solid wood. I will be drilling some holes for drainage and using pine shavings to line the bottom. But, we will not have to worry about foxes, raccoons or weasels digging underneath and in to eat our future egg-producing, clucking, crowing residents.

PS – Welcome Back Readers!

 

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